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“Be Me”…Thoughts on the Sacrament and Eternal Life

Last week, the following came to me:

Christ said, “Come unto Me”, and the journey began

He said, “Walk with Me”, and we walked, and talked

He said, “Be with Me”, and we sat

Then He said, “Be Me”…to be continued.

 

Of course, the question of what it means to “Be Me” was obvious, and I asked for help.

This morning, I was reading something that “Pure Revelation” (a blog maintained by a friend who wishes to remain anonymous) wrote about the sacrament, when I suddenly knew that the sacrament is symbolic of “Be Me”.  Let me try to explain.  I say “try” because I don’t know that I fully understand it myself, even if the knowledge was suddenly there at the time.

Christ’s body and blood, as symbolized by the bread and wine, represent His physical death – the end of His mortal existence on earth.  He conquered His fear of death – the fear of non-existence that is perpetuated by the ego – and the proof of that was his submission to be tortured, humiliated, and crucified.  He knew who he was – not only the Christ but, even before that, a being of divine, eternal destiny, a perfect manifestation of God the Father.  He knew that He was, above all, a being who would never die, because that’s how He was created.  Christ had that knowledge.

Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live:  And whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die. Believest thou this? (John 11:25-26)

Do we believe this?  Is the sacrament symbolic of our “believing” in this – that we, like Him, are beings of divine, eternal destiny, who shall never die?  Is the sacrament then symbolic of the atonement – the promise that we will all inherit that eternal destiny, the very measure of our creation?  Is the sacrament really symbolic of eternal life, or, as PR said, “The New Covenant”; “New” because it could now be offered by Christ because He partook of mortality without sacrificing His divinity?  Is the sacrament symbolic of His call for us to do the same: to receive this new covenant; to come unto Him; to follow Him; to believe in Him?

Is the sacrament, then, symbolic of His invitation to “Be Me”?

Breathe, Scoot.  Just breathe.

Consider the possibility that Christ conquered death long before He was crucified.  There are multiple extra-biblical accounts of His journeys between the ages of 12 and 30 that suggest that he spent that time traveling the current known world, studying and teaching with “ascended” or “enlightened” masters in India, Nepal, Persia, Egypt, Greece, and perhaps other places.  The “Aquarian Gospel” describes how He was recognized everywhere as the most ascended of all the ascended masters.  If this is true, then it seems that, by the time He returned to His homeland to begin the ministry recorded in the New Testament, He had already uncovered the knowledge of His divinity.

Then comes what occurs to me might be the real climax of His mortal life and ministry – the 40 day fast in the desert.  This is where He conquered death.  This is where He came to a full awareness of His ascension as “The Only Begotten”.  40 DAYS!  Without food.  Without water?  How is that possible?  Was He translated by that time?

Regardless, this is where He partook of the fruit of the tree of life.  I have speculated before that, if we can overcome the ego – the natural man – forsaking the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil, we can unlock the power over the elements, no longer bound by time, space, and form.  In other words, our divinity overcomes the ego.

Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live:  And whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die. Believest thou this? (John 11:25-26)

Then, at the end of the 40 day fast, Christ had one last chance to surrender to the ego, represented in the scriptures by Satan.  By this point, He had the power to turn rocks into bread!  He had the power to rule the world.  He had the power to command the elements to the point of cheating gravity and certain death. He had the power to heal the leper, give sight to the blind, and cast out demons. Had he surrendered to the temptations of the ego, He still had the power and the knowledge, but He didn’t exercise them for the sake of power or control, ultimately not even to save His own mortal life.  His mortal body held no value to Him except as a tool to perform His ministry; a tool to teach; a tool to heal; a tool to lead…a tool to love.

I love this Christ!

I am reminded that it was only after this experience that Christ came to John for baptism.  I’ll leave it to you to ponder what that might mean for the rest of us.

When Christ resisted Satan’s temptations, He sealed the victory over death.  In this context, the passion was almost anti-climactic.

So, as I seek to understand what it means to “Be Me”, I am led to the

 conclusion that I, too, must overcome my fear of death.

We all fear death.  As we get older, we often come to grips with it.  Perhaps we kid ourselves that we don’t fear it, but our ego is not going to “go gentle into that good night”, and it is our ego that is the source of that fear.

So, how might we overcome our fear of death, so that we might learn to recognize this mortal body not as the definition, the alpha and omega, of our existence, but instead as merely “a tool to perform His ministry; a tool to teach; a tool to heal; a tool to lead…a tool to love.”  How might we learn to “be me”?

I have come to recognize that God’s will is simply that we love God and love our neighbor as we love ourselves. That’s it.  That is the elusive “will of the Lord” that we all seek to know.  It’s all about the love!  Everything else that we might conjure is nothing more than an attempt by us to force God to love us; to take control of our salvation and eternal life.  This proves to be an exercise in futility, because, in reality, there is nothing we can do to cause Him not to love us; and there is nothing we can do to not have eternal life.  Except, of course, to just not receive it.  But even then, we’re only delaying the inevitable.

But there is something we can control.  We can choose whether or not we engage in the earthly progression of comparison, competition, contention, and control that characterizes most of our individual, family, and social relationships.  We can choose whether or not we indulge in jealousies and fears; in guilt, in judgment, in a desire for justice and punishment, and the belief that such is somehow righteous.  Ultimately, we can control whether or not we choose joy.  We can control whether or not we choose to love.

And this, my friends, is what it means to choose life.  Christ taught us throughout His ministries what it means to choose life. He taught this in the Sermon on the Mount.  He taught this, of course, at the temple in Bountiful.  He taught it to Martha after raising Lazarus from the dead.  He taught it to Nicodemus in the shadows of the night.  He taught it to His disciples.  He is teaching it to me.   I choose to believe Him!

I choose to shake my head at myself every time I recognize a thought based in judgment, or guilt, or jealousy, or pride.  Then, I choose to remember that He loves me no matter what, and that he’s cheering me on – because this is hard!  Then I remember that He showed me how!  Then, I choose peace.  Yep – I shake my head, and wonder at the grip that my ego has on me, and I learn another lesson, and then I choose peace.

I might shake my head at the actions of someone else, but then, more and more often, I choose to regard them with peace and joy.  Then I try really, really hard to reject judgment, because I know that inside that other person is a divine creation just like me who someday will experience the same eternal life that I have been promised.  After all, we are all creations of the same God.

And, you know what? I look for…no I seek…no, I crave opportunities to tell someone about that divinity in them, about how good they are, and about how joy is at their fingertips!  I crave opportunities to tell them that this joy is actually their very essence; it’s who they are – if they will just reach for it.  And every time I do that, I create waves of joy and love and acceptance throughout the universe…waves that quickly come back to me.  Every time I do that, I create love.  And that is the same creation process that God used to create you, and me, and the mountains and the trees and the sky and the moon and stars and sun…the whole universe.  That…is eternal life.

So, I choose to create…life.  Not death.  Not judgment and justice and punishment.  I choose to create life.  And that life becomes me, and I become it, because I can’t create something that I know nothing of, or that isn’t part of me.

And Christ is the way, the truth, and the life.  And every time I choose life, and reject the very seeds of death, I become just a little more Christ.

Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live:  And whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die. Believest thou this? (John 11:25-26)

None of this is easy.  But it’s a lot easier than it was a decade, a year, a month – heck, even a week ago.

Christ said, “Come unto Me”, and the journey began

He said, “Walk with Me”, and we walked, and talked

He said, “Be with Me”, and we sat

Then He said, “Be Me”.

And I asked for help.

And I knew it would come.

And I think maybe, in spite of myself, I’m actually starting to figure out what He meant when he said…

“Be Me.”

And I will never think of the sacrament in the same way again.

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One comment on ““Be Me”…Thoughts on the Sacrament and Eternal Life

  1. Jesus did a water fast for 40-days according to Pure Revelations:
    Jesus’ plan was to be baptized and begin a long term waterfast to know His mission. He had done these before, but not
    the 40-day kind, this would be a first. He brought his…

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